Valentine’s Been Through This Before

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In Bobby Valentine’s first full year with the Mets, the team started out 4-10 and the veterans had already spent a substantial amount of time before the season in clandestine meetings discussing how and whether they should try to get him fired.

This was after he’d managed the team for a total of 31 games in late 1996.

Valentine was under constant pressure from the media for another already lost Mets’ season after 14 games. They’d been bad for so long, the front office hadn’t spent any money to improve a club that had finished the previous season at 71-91 under Dallas Green and Valentine and it looked as if they were well on the way to an even worse year.

But Valentine maintained his positive outlook, insisted that the team was better than they were playing and swore they’d turn it around.

No one believed in him or the Mets.

But they slowly pulled themselves together and were 18-18 after 36 games. They worked their way over .500 until they were as much as 15 games over .500 by August and one game out of the Wild Card lead.

Because they were in a division with the Braves and Marlins, they didn’t come close to a playoff spot. A massive trade made by new GM Steve Phillips brought Turk Wendell, Mel Rojas and Brian McRae from the Cubs for Mark Clark, Lance Johnson and Manny Alexander and didn’t pay the immediate dividends they’d hoped for. It wound up being a net winner for the team because the only player who was of any long-term use to either club was Wendell, but for the rest of 1997, it failed.

That September as the club faded, Valentine engaged in a public spat with star catcher Todd Hundley as Valentine complained about Hundley’s sleeping habits (or lack thereof) negatively affecting his game.

Valentine had also had a preseason dispute with pitcher Pete Harnisch as Harnisch was dealing with depression and withdrawal from quitting chewing tobacco. Valentine was blamed for the mid-season firing of GM Joe McIlvaine in a power struggle which Valentine won.

After the season he was held responsible for the ouster of longtime broadcaster Tim McCarver because Valentine felt McCarver doled too much criticism on the Mets.

Overall, Valentine came off as cold, heartless, dismissive of player complaints and Machiavellian in his attempts to accumulate organizational power from the composition of the roster to the teaching in the minor league system to the front office structure to the men in the broadcast booth.

Some of the allegations were based in truth and others were scapegoating because Valentine was an easy target since he was so polarizing.

The best starter on the staff that season wound up being Rick Reed. Reed was a journeyman righty who was shunned in the clubhouse by leader John Franco because he’d been a replacement player in 1995. Valentine managed him at the Mets’ Triple A affiliate in Norfolk and believed in him. Uninterested in acquiescing to demands or forging bonds with his veterans like Franco, Valentine did what he thought was right for his team.

And it worked.

Factions of the clubhouse hated him, but other players swore by him rather than at him because without Valentine’s insistence and belief, they wouldn’t have had major league careers at all.

Three years later, the Mets were in the World Series.

What has to be remembered now as he’s trying to handle the Red Sox is that underestimating his stubbornness and resiliency is a big mistake.

Those who think Valentine is going to resign from the Red Sox job because of a bad start can forget it.

The 1997 Mets didn’t have the expectations of the 2012 Red Sox. They weren’t trying to rebound from a humiliating collapse. In fact, that Mets team came out of nowhere.

But there are similarities to the circumstances.

If he gets a sense that the wind is blowing in the direction of him being fired, Valentine is not going to go down meekly and if that means taking on members of the front office like GM Ben Cherington or players who are running interference and smearing him behind his back, he’s going to do that.

This is not to say that Valentine has done a good job with the Red Sox because he hasn’t. Everyone is at fault for the mess they’re in. Ten years out of a Major League dugout might have caused the game to pass him by. Perhaps he can’t relate to today’s players and is overmatched for this toxic brew and massive scrutiny that no one could’ve anticipated. If that’s the case, then the hiring was a mistake, but to imply that any other manager would have a better record with this group is pure folly. The idea that “somewhere Terry Francona and Theo Epstein are laughing” is possible, but if true both men are doing a wonderful job of brushing aside their contributions to this burgeoning disaster.

Valentine didn’t put this team together, but he’s got to deal with it.

This is his last opportunity. He’s not going to give it up without a fight.

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2 thoughts on “Valentine’s Been Through This Before

  1. Still, I wonder if Valentine has enough ammo for the fight.

    I won’t pretend to know anything about the mid-90s Mets, but did the clubhouse veterans wield the kind of power that Pedroia and Youk do in Boston?

    The fact that this team is almost a contender works against Bobby V, in my estimation. As you mentioned above, the Mets weren’t really any good when he got to New York. Nobody expected them to win anything.

    So it was when Ron Washington arrived in Texas. He had similar issues with guys who fancied themselves stars on a team that was terrible. Factions formed and certain players (Mark Teixeira, Gerald Laird) had to be weeded out. The GM stood behind the manager and helped him foster a unified clubhouse. Anybody that couldn’t get with the program was shipped off.

    Can that possibly happen in Boston? Is there any scenario where Valentine tries to take on Pedroia or Youk and actually wins? The GM and other front office people probably wouldn’t back him. The other players wouldn’t turn against their beloved veteran leaders.

    And the fans?

    I just don’t see how there’s any chance Bobby gets out of this alive unless he can get the old guys on his side. If he does it his way and it blows up in his face, that’s fine. It’s up to him to decide how to handle the situation.

    As we go on, though, I don’t see many outs. This may be a no-win for him. Unfortunate that he burned (probably) his last shot at managing by stepping into a clubhouse that’s in such shambles.

    1. I thought they should’ve listened to offers on Youkilis in the winter but his value was down and it’s now gone down even further.
      Washington was a different case in that he was almost fired, but wasn’t and the team suddenly turned their season around and saved his job. Daniels didn’t want Washington when they made the hire–he wanted Don Wakamatsu.
      The Red Sox have a few options: make a drastic trade of a name player to support the manager; let the veterans win their tantrum-war and dump Valentine; move forward as is for a couple of months and hope things get better.
      If I were Valentine (and this is what I think he’ll do), I’d say to myself, “If I’m going down, I’m doing it my way.”
      I don’t know if it’ll work, but at least he won’t walk away saying he made a mistake in being something he’s not.

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