Who Cares What Michael Kay Says?

Hall Of Fame, History, Management, Media, Paul Lebowitz's 2012 Baseball Guide, Players

Getting angry at Michael Kay for what he says is like screaming at your cat if he throws up on the floor. He’ll look at you, uncomprehendingly, then go about his business without understanding why you’re yelling. Nor will he care. Then when he feels like throwing up again, he’ll do so, probably in the exact same spot he threw up in the last time.

Kay is the obnoxious Yankee fan at whom even his fellow Yankees’ fans cringe, hoping that at some point, he’ll shut up or go home so they can enjoy the game. The major difference is that he happens to be the Yankees’ play-by-play announcer on the YES Network and has a mid-afternoon radio show on ESPN in New York. Now there’s an uproar on Twitter because Kay said (I’m paraphrasing) that he hopes the Mets lose every game for the rest of the season. He also said that he stands by his statement because the Mets fans weren’t interested in having a civil discourse, so he “handled” it in his own way.

Handled it?

Does he have a special phone with access to the Baseball Gods with Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Babe Ruth, Alexander Cartwright and Christy Mathewson so he can make his petulant, “I know you are but what am I?” whims come to fruition?

Who cares what Michael Kay says about anything? Does his tantrum have one ounce of an effect on the rest of the Mets’ season? No. So why reply to it?

The easy temptation here is to cite the numerous examples of why Kay’s not someone who should be paid attention to in regards to a baseball-related matter, but why? It’s like arguing with a monkey. The end result is to exhaust yourself with nothing resolved or accomplished. There are calls for him to be fired from ESPN Radio and accusations of unprofessionalism, but the scuttlebutt is that Kay is probably on his way out at ESPN by the new year and he’s never exhibited any form of objective professionalism to begin with, so why enable his childish ranting by engaging him?

He doesn’t like social media and the way fans react to him? He has a choice: block them, ignore them, or fight with them. This silliness of wishing the Mets to lose every game for the rest of the season is something out of the third grade, which is convenient because that’s essentially the venue where Kay would be on an even playing field in a baseball argument. And he’d lose.

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