Francesa, A-Rod and Dr. Gross

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Mike Francesa spent his entire show today referencing Alex Rodriguez’s second opinion on his injured quadriceps and essentially accusing the Yankees of intentionally keeping A-Rod out of the lineup. A multitude of reasons were presented for this decision the most prominent being that the Yankees don’t want to pay A-Rod. As much as Francesa attempted to chastise the organization, painted them into a corner to let A-Rod play and boosted A-Rod as a potential cure to the Yankees offensive ills, let’s not make A-Rod into a victim here. Here’s all you need to know:

  • The Yankees don’t want to pay A-Rod.
  • The Yankees are hoping that the Biogenesis suspension of A-Rod comes sooner rather than later so they don’t have to answer questions about him.
  • A-Rod wants to get back on the field to get his money.

Toward whatever end is on A-Rod’s plate at the moment, he continually draws the ire of the organization and break rules that are clear in the collective bargaining agreement. He is not supposed to go see a doctor without team approval. Dr. Gross examined an A-Rod MRI and was clearly encouraged by A-Rod to publicize his findings. But for Francesa’s bolstering of this doctor’s diagnosis because he wants A-Rod back in the Yankees lineup out of some clinging to an adolescent fantasy that they still have a chance at the playoffs this year, no one would’ve paid any attention to this whatsoever. If it’s discussed for 5 1/2 hours, everyone—including the organization—is going to notice and react.

As bad as their third basemen have been this year, A-Rod was probably as bad if not worse in the playoffs last season, so they don’t know if they’ll get much more from him than what they’ve gotten from Kevin Youkilis, David Adams, Luis Cruz, et al. For all of the vouching Francesa has done for Dr. Gross, the “right” and “wrong” here is not clear-cut. The report that Dr. Gross was reprimanded by the New Jersey State Attorney General surfaced shortly after his star-turn with Francesa. It doesn’t take a conspiracy theorist to surmise that the politically-connected Yankees made certain that this came out as a means of defending the organization from this attack.

It’s not as simplistic as Francesa’s, “He’s a good playa and da Yankees need ‘im.” This is about money, a player they would like out of their sight and off their books. It’s about A-Rod, who wants to be paid as per the terms of his contract. They both have an agenda that goes beyond Francesa again indulging in a logic that was once limited to his callers by saying that the team needs a player and should let that player play without considering the collateral implications. Francesa wagged the dog today and the dog—the Yankees—wagged back.

It will be interesting to see if this degenerates into another cold war between Francesa and a New York organization. His self-indulgent battles with the New York Jets have sabotaged any pretense of objectivity between himself and the team. The Yankees are presumably pretty angry at Francesa for causing them this aggravation and, as was shown with the speed with which this doctor’s history was laid bare for all to see, will retaliate when fired upon. They went after the doctor first. Francesa could be next.

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The Dodgers Were Flawed To Begin With

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Injuries have been a significant factor for the Dodgers. Their starting rotation “depth” with which they entered spring training holding eight starters has seen one after another eliminated. Aaron Harang was traded to the Rockies who subsequently sent him to the Mariners where he’s pitched poorly. Chris Capuano is on the disabled list with a strained calf. Chad Billingsley is out for the year with Tommy John surgery. Ted Lilly is out with a ribcage strain. Zack Greinke has a broken collarbone. All of a sudden they’re down to three bona fide starting pitchers: Clayton Kershaw, Josh Beckett and Hyun-jin Ryu.

As for the lineup, Hanley Ramirez was on the disabled list with a thumb injury, came back sooner than expected and strained a hamstring. Mark Ellis has a strained quadriceps, Adrian Gonzalez has a strained neck. On the bright side, Carl Crawford is enjoying a renaissance now that he’s healthy and out of Boston, not necessarily in that order.

Don Mattingly’s job status as manager is being called into question because he’s in the final guaranteed year of his contract.

There are plenty of excuses but none approach an explanation for the crux of the problem: they were overrated by those with stars in their eyes. The injuries have affected them to be sure, but at the start of the season they didn’t have a legitimate starting third baseman and have been playing Luis Cruz who has a pitcher-like 6 hits in 71 plate appearances; they overspent to keep Brandon League as their closer and he hasn’t been good because—here’s a flash—he isn’t good. They did a lot of “stuff” over the past year since the new ownership took over almost as a set of diametrically opposed maneuverings to what Frank McCourt did in his decried time as the owner. The key difference is that the new ownership received accolades for “restoring” the Dodgers’ star power and McCourt was reviled for his apparent graft and selfishness, but McCourt’s teams were competitive and made the playoffs four times in his nine years of ownership. A break here and a break there and they win a World Series or two.

This Dodgers team was thought to be better than it was because of star/spending power. Magic Johnson, Stan Kasten, moneymoneymoney. The 13-20 record is a result of injuries. They’re not this bad. But if they were completely healthy, they’re still not a championship team which, given the amount of cash they’ve laid out, is what should’ve been and apparently was expected judging by the reaction their slow start is receiving. The season is still salvageable. It’s only May, but their ceiling wasn’t that high to start and now with the stars they acquired to fill the seats instead filling the disabled list, there’s not much they can do other than wait and hope for health and the backs of the bubblegum cards to hold true. They have no other choice.

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